Tag: Veterans Affairs

Service-Connected Veteran Disability Pay Increase

H.R. 1329, also known as: “Veteran’s Compensation Cost-of-Living Adjustment Act of 2017” finally enacts what you would expect would happen… Veterans with service-connected disability will see an increase in their compensation payments for the purpose of offsetting inflation.  You can think of inflation as simply what happens when you blink and your regular $3.00 gallon of milk is suddenly $3.06. Six cents may not seem like a lot but when you consider the amount of goods purchased by each household, it will certainly add up over time. Your grandma wasn’t kidding when she said a dollar doesn’t go as far as it used to.

Nevertheless, this newly-enacted law requires that VA disability compensation increase by the same percentage each year as the Social Security old age and disability compensation increases. This rate increase not only affects the basic service-connected compensation, but also benefits for clothing allowance (if a Veteran’s prosthesis/medical device causes unusual wear and tear of clothing), and benefits for surviving spouses and children.  For 2018, the increase is 2% which is literally $2 for every $100 in compensation. Again, that may not seem like much but after hearing, reading, and witnessing the struggle of many Veterans and their surviving spouses and children, I can’t help but rejoice in those extra few dollars each month.

It is important to note that the rate of increase will not be the same each year. The 2% increase for this coming year is the highest in five years but also a far cry from the 14.3% cost-of-living adjustment in 1980. The Congressional Budget Office submitted their report on the cost of this bill in May 2017. Their estimate included a 2.5% increase, so adjusting for the lesser, actual increase, the cost of this bill will approximately in $1.44 billion in 2018. Inflation sucks (most of the time).

Veterans 2nd Amendment Protection Act (H.R. 1181)

It’s no secret that the mental health of our Veterans is a hot topic; not only how to manage it, but also the consequences of it. As a Veteran and a caregiver to my Veteran husband who was injured in Iraq, I understand first-hand why it is so important that we study and improve on services for our men and women in the military. That being said, the rights of some Veterans are being taken away because the VA has determined they are “mentally incompetent” to manage their own finances. This determination could be for many different reasons but it results in the appointment of someone to oversee their VA compensation (often a loved one or friend) and the denial to own a firearm. You read that properly. A man or woman who has served our country honorably and fought to keep them safe could potentially lose the right to bear arms, a right afforded to them in the 2nd Amendment.

Enter H.R. 1181, the Veterans 2nd Amendment Protection Act. With a vote of 240-175, the bill was passed in the House today. The bill seeks to correct language about gun ownership that is too broad. The U.S. Code which outlines criminal acts, makes owning a gun a crime for anyone who has been “adjudicated as a mental defective.” Under this new bill, if passed, a judge, magistrate, or someone “of judical authority” must determine that a Veteran is a danger to themself or others.

I am not going to slam the VA here. After five years in Army administration, I know how hard it can be to ensure that you are following regulation to the letter of the law (there is rarely room for “spirit of the law”). However, in an attempt to do so, the VA has reported thousands of names of Veterans to the FBI’s National Instant Background Check System which would prevent them from buying a gun. This may not seem like a bad idea, except a Veteran who can’t manage their bills properly are now kept from claiming a right that they, ironically, had to make use of during their service.  Some reports say that 167,000 Veterans are listed because of their inability to manage finances; still others list it at 257,000. Whatever the number, it is unfair to take away such a right under these circumstances. Forgetting that your cable bill is due every month does not equal being a danger to anyone.

I thoroughly support background checks and preventing those who are dangerous from owning a gun. I will add that where there is a will, there is, unfortunately sometimes, a way. We cannot prevent all gun violence, or violence using any weapon, however, laws are an important defense against it. Nevertheless, we have to give our Veterans a fair chance. Just because you are bruised, doesn’t mean you are broken.